Haiku submissions wanted …

11 April, 2018

How to compose classical haiku

Here at Pure Haiku I only publish classical haiku in the English language which are constructed in the strict syllabic structure of 5-7-5.
First line = 5 syllables
Second line = 7 syllables
Third line = 5 syllables

Here is an example: –

The cool night frost melts
with the warm breath of bird song.
Winter dawn chorus.

© Elizabeth Leaper 2013

Line 1 the (1) cool (1) night (1) frost (1) melts (1) = 5 syllables
Line 2 with (1) the (1) warm (1) breath (1) of (1) bird (1) song (1) = 7 syllables
Line 3 Winter (2) dawn (1) chorus (2) = 5 syllables

Pure Haiku is currently OPEN to Submissions.

The THEME is CELESTIAL BODIES.

This time, you are not allowed to use the words Celestial or Body / Bodies in your haiku/senyru (and you cannot use these words in the title, if you choose to provide titles for your submissions). I want to receive haiku/senyru that are implicit in their mentions of CELESTIAL BODIES.

Delight me and surprise me with your haiku that paint vivid pictures of CELESTIAL BODIES, real or imagined. Explore the Final Frontier, take me to universes I did not know existed. As always I’m looking for excellent use of language and words that conjure up clear, vivid pictures; show, don’t tell.

There will be 20 slots for individual haiku plus a week’s slot for a single featured haiku writer.

The DEADLINE for submissions is 20th April 2018 at midnight.

CELESTIAL BODIES themed haiku written in the traditional/classical form (5-7-5 syllables) will be posted on this site in May & June 2018. Make the most of this submission period because Pure Haiku will be taking a rest over the Summer won’t be opening to submissions again until October 2018.

Find out how to submit your haiku at Submissions

If you read the following pages you are more likely to have your haiku accepted: –

What I Am Looking For

How To Compose Classical Haiku

FAQS

Selection Process

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Open to Submissions!

2 April, 2018

Pure Haiku is currently OPEN to Submissions.

The THEME is CELESTIAL BODIES.

This time, you are not allowed to use the words Celestial or Body / Bodies in your haiku/senyru (and you cannot use these words in the title, if you choose to provide titles for your submissions). I want to receive haiku/senyru that are implicit in their mentions of CELESTIAL BODIES.

Delight me and surprise me with your haiku that paint vivid pictures of CELESTIAL BODIES, real or imagined. Explore the Final Frontier, take me to universes I did not know existed. As always I’m looking for excellent use of language and words that conjure up clear, vivid pictures; show, don’t tell.

There will be 20 slots for individual haiku plus a week’s slot for a single featured haiku writer.

The DEADLINE for submissions is 20th April 2018 at midnight.

CELESTIAL BODIES themed haiku written in the traditional/classical form (5-7-5 syllables) will be posted on this site in May & June 2018. Make the most of this submission period because Pure Haiku will be taking a rest over the Summer won’t be opening to submissions again until October 2018.

How to submit to Purehaiku

If you would like to submit your haiku for publication on this site, please send a maximum of 5 haiku written in the classical form on the current theme to: –

purehaiku (at) gmail (dot) com

with SUBMISSIONS, the current THEME and your NAME in the subject line.

Please include the following in the body of the email: –
Your first name
Your last name
Your email address
Your haiku (all 5 in one email please) (they do not have to be titled)
The full address of your blog or website if you have one
The name you want to appear on the copyright
One sentence introducing yourself. Be quirky and interesting – you want people to visit your blog, don’t you?!

By submitting your haiku you confirm that you are the author of the work and that you give me permission to publish your work at Pure Haiku. The copyright remains with you, the author.

Please send me each haiku with just one or two lines of spacing between each one in the body of your email.

When you have emailed your submission, you should receive an auto reply informing you of the date when I will be in contact with you. If you do not receive an auto reply within 24 hours, please feel free to send a second email enquiring about your original submission.

I can only accept haiku for consideration if they are EMAILED to me at the above mentioned address. Please DO NOT submit haiku via the comments box or via a facebook message or via G+ messaging.

Please do not send attachments. I can only accept haiku that are submitted in the body of the email.

If you read the following pages you are more likely to have your haiku accepted: –

What I Am Looking For

How To Compose Classical Haiku

FAQS

Selection Process


Sailing into the sunset …

26 March, 2018
Thank you for sailing with us on this Ocean-themed journey!
A new theme will be announced on 2nd April so keep a look out for that! As usual you’ll have 3 weeks to submit your work here.
Don’t forget that if you submit 4-5 haiku you’ll be in with a chance to be selected as the featured haiku writer for the theme!
I’m also releasing a FREE book on 2nd April at my other blog, Dragonscale Clippings So don’t miss out on Silver Fire, Volume One of The Kaerling!
Sail in peace until we meet once more …

SeaweedHeart

© Freya Pickard 2018

3 – 23 – featured haiku writer

23 March, 2018
diver’s slow descent
deep within a well of blue
subaquatic dream
© Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr 2018

Here is the final haiku from our featured haiku writer, Ken Gierke. Photography has always been a favorite pastime, so taking photos often is as important to him as the sights he sees, but those sights aren’t limited to Nature. He finds himself seeking angles and lines, and, as you might expect, some of the most intriguing lines can be found in architecture, but they also can be seen in groups of objects – and that includes people. Check out Ken’s other creative work at Rivrvlogr

As we started the week with a relaxing haiku, so we end the week with a dreamy sea haiku; the image of the “well of blue” stuck with me for days after first reading this haiku.
This haiku is part of my OCEAN series.

3 – 22 – featured haiku writer

22 March, 2018
in the darkest depths
confined within rusting hulks
lie watery graves
© Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr 2018

Here is the fourth haiku from our featured haiku writer, Ken Gierke. Time spent on or near the water has always been important to Ken. In a past life that meant boating and scuba diving. Today it means kayaking or walking along a river or stream. It may even mean sitting on a shoreline, writing poetry. Don’t forget to follow Ken at Rivrvlogr

Again, this haiku stayed with me from the first reading; such a dark scene, chilling and eerie. And I love the way Ken shows, rather than tells.
This haiku is part of my OCEAN series.

3 – 21 – featured haiku writer

21 March, 2018
towering brown kelp
algae rich in nutrients
abalone feed
© Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr 2018

Here is the third haiku from our featured haiku writer, Ken Gierke. He retired and was then transplanted from Western New York to Missouri. He finds himself missing familiar sights, but reminds himself that familiarity is a state of mind. Have you visited his blog yet at Rivrvlogr

I loved the image of the “towering brown kelp” – such a brilliant image for kelp floating in water.
This haiku is part of my OCEAN series.

3 – 20 – featured haiku writer

20 March, 2018
surf pounds rocky shore
tower of light guides sailors
safe harbour refuge
© Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr 2018

Here is the second haiku from our featured haiku writer, Ken Gierke. He tells me that he is inspired by the poets he follows on WordPress. You can read more of his work at Rivrvlogr

This haiku stood out to me from the first reading; the contrast between the shore and the safe harbour. I also liked his implicit mention of the lighthouse.
This haiku is part of my OCEAN series.

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